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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

STATE STANDARDS 

English/Language Arts

A. A student should be able to speak and write well for a variety of purposes and audiences.

B. A student should be a competent and thoughtful reader, listener, and viewer of literature, technical materials, and a variety of other information.

C. A student should be able to identify and select from multiple strategies in Order to complete projects independently and cooperatively.

D. A student should be able to think logically and reflectively in order to present and explain positions based on relevant and reliable information.

History

A. A student should understand that history is a record of human experiences that links the past to the present and the future.

Arts

A. A student should be able to create and perform in the arts.

E. A student should be able to recognize beauty and meaning through the arts in the student's life.

World Languages

A. A student should be able to communicate in two or more languages, one of which is English.

B. A student should expand the student's knowledge of peoples and cultures through language study.

Who We Are 

Music, Art, Dance, and Drama

Jessica Denny, Stacie Charley, Stephanie Charley, Lena Charley, Marilynn Beeter, Colene Charley and Bjorn Beeter at 2002 Potlatch.
Courtesy of Doyle Traw
Jessica Denny, Stacie Charley, Stephanie Charley, Lena Charley, Marilynn Beeter, Colene Charley and Bjorn Beeter at 2002 Potlatch.

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. work with Elders or a knowledgeable adult/expert to learn details of their culture which may include the language, dance, songs, art, and stories.
  2. create a play or poem which reflects aspects of their culture.
  3. write or speak about aspects of their culture, comparing it to another.
  4. work with an Elder or a knowledgeable adult/expert to learn about aspects of their culture that are permitted or not permitted at certain times .
  5. demonstrate their knowledge and learning through a variety of presentations.
  6. be able to identify their clan and the importance of clans in their culture.

 

Lesson 

GRADES K -12

Activities:

1. Visit with an Elder or local expert to learn about the cultural "do's and don'ts". What is permitted and what is "Engii".

2. Take a field trip/walk through the Village and make a list of all the beautiful things in nature (shapes, colors, sounds, textures). In the classroom, you may wish to incorporate these in a story, painting, poem, or a painting, collage, or other type of art. Some students may wish to use the Athabascan Dictionary as an aid in their writing others may wish the aid of an Elder or other knowledgeable person.

3. Some high school students may wish to join the Native Oratory Society and plan, organize, practice, and present a speech in Statewide competition which reflects upon cultural traditions.

4. Write stories which reflect cultural knowledge and learning and which utilize the standards and conventions of a well written paper.

Publish the efforts of the students in a newsletter, school/district newspaper, yearbook, or on the school web site.

5. Plan, write, create stage props ,and act in a play which reflects aspects of the culture or a cultural story.

6. Plan, organize, and participate in a mini pow-wow or potlatch.

7. Plan, organize, and participate in a Cultural Pride Day which would showcase poetry, stories, dance, songs, etc. that would reflect cultural knowledge and pride.

8. Publish an anthology of writings (stories, play scripts, poetry, etc) present a copy to the local library.

9. Work with Elders or local experts to create, sew, and bead traditional clothing and apparel.

10. Work with an Elder or local expert to learn the local language.

11. Work with an Elder or local expert to learn the traditional songs, drumming, and dances.

12. Work with an Elder or local expert to learn the art of drum making, bow/arrow making, snowshoe making, basketry, beading, hunting, and trapping.

13. Utilize knowledge and learning to participate in local, State or National events such as:

*Alaska Federation of Natives Conference

*Fairbanks Native Arts Festival

*Gathering of Nations National Pow-Wow

*Local or school district events

14. Work with an Elder and discuss clans, the importance of clans in their culture and identify which clan they are members of.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

A. Culturally-knowledgeable students are well grounded in the cultural heritage and traditions of their community.

B. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to build on the knowledge and skills of the local cultural community as a foundation from which to achieve personal and academic success throughout life.

C. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to actively participate in various cultural environments.

D. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to engage effectively in learning activities that are based on traditional ways of knowing and learning.

E. Culturally-knowledgeable students demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the relationships and processes of interaction of all elements in the world around them.

 

slippersTeacher Note:

Please note: This can only be taught at certain times of the year. Elders can only come in during the winter months to talk about stories. THIS IS "ENGII", NOT ALLOWED AT ANY OTHER TIME OF THE YEAR.

This is a very strict rule.

Poetry, in its many different forms, is an excellent way for students to reflect upon the area that they live. Arrange a field trip into the Village inviting the Elders to speak with the students about oral traditions akin to poetry.

Tuu

Tuu (Water)

Rain
One Drop
Fell in the Copper River
Frolicked as it slid down the mountains

Plummeted
From coastal born clouds
And rolled off the back of a moose

Glided down
The cheeks of Elders
Sharing their knowledge

And

Dropped in
Mentasta Lake
Nourishing it

Rain
The welcomed traveler 

by Barb Dalke

Flower design

 

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
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ANKN
Last modified August 17, 2006