This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner Home Page About ANKN Publications Academic Programs Curriculum Resources Calendar of Events Announcements Site Index This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

Where Does Our Food Come From?

STATE STANDARDS

English/Language Arts

A. A student should be able to speak and write well for a variety of purposes and audiences.

B. A student should be a competent and thoughtful reader, listener, and viewer of literature, technical materials, and a variety of other information.

C. A student should be able to identify and select from multiple strategies in order to complete projects independently and cooperatively.

E. A student should understand and respect the perspectives of others in order to communicate effectively.

Geography

A. A student should be able to make and use maps, globes, and graphs to gather, analyze, and report spatial information.

B. A student should be able to utilize, analyze, and explain information about the human and physical features of places and regions.

E. A student should understand and be able to evaluate how humans and physical environments interact.

F. A student should be able to use geography to understand the world by interpreting the past, knowing the present, and preparing for the future.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

B. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to build on the knowledge and skills of the local cultural community as a foundation from which to achieve personal and academic success throughout life.

C. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to actively participate in various cultural environments.

D. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to engage effectively in learning activities that are based on traditional ways of knowing and learning.

Moose quarters and head hang under a tree ready for final butchering and use.
© Bill Hess
Moose quarters and head hang under a tree ready for final butchering and use.

 

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

1. learn about the sources, location and availability of local food.
2. develop mapping skills.
3. interact with Elders to gain pertinent information.
4. understand subsistence issues of the past and present.

Lesson

GRADES K -12

Activities:

  1. Make a list of foods commonly found in your area. With the help of Elders, construct a chart. The chart will be different depending upon where you live. It may look similar to this example:

berries

Type of Food

Availability

Methods of Getting Food

Location

Moose

Hunting Season

Hunting (Adults)

High in mountains during early fall lakes & ponds

Caribou

Winter

Hunting (Adults)

Tundra Areas

Salmon

June, July, August

Fishing (Adults)

Rivers

Blueberries

Late Summer

Gathering (Adults & Children)

Scattered Growth

2. Make a list of foods that an Athabascan person can obtain today. This time, include foods you can buy at a store and commonly eat. Think of:

a. availability

b. method of obtaining food

c. location

d. cost

e. nutritional value

3. Make a map of the area around your community and label the map, "Food Producing Areas."

a. Color those areas that produce food.

b. Make a scale plastic overlay marked off in a grid. Place it over your map and count the square units (measure in miles) that can support life to supply food. What percentage of the total area supports food sources?

4. Make a seasonal hunting chart like the one above for your area.

5. Report your findings using Power Point or a similar program to the class and schedule a meeting with the Village Council to present findings.

6. Reflect upon findings in a journal entry.

7. Speak with the Tribal Council and Elders about subsistence issues of the past. Discuss the importance of these issues to the Village. Research current day issues. Connect any continuing subsistence issue trends from the past to the present in State laws, politics, or court decisions.

8. Recall from memory (mental mapping) areas that are sources of food for the Village. Have an Elder listen for accuracy to your recollection of these areas.

9. Arrange for an outdoor field trip with an Elder(s) for food gathering, i.e. root gathering.

Food iconTeacher Note:

Local food sources vary from one Village to another. Local food may come to us from forests, flats, tundra, rivers and lakes (i.e. fish,caribou, geese, ducks, moose, berries, roots, etc.). Each Village has different resources and, therefore, different sources. The Elders and Village Council can help you and the students identify the important food sources for the Village.

Discussion Ideas:

1. What was life like in the Village when all food was collected by fishing, hunting, or gathering?

2. What percentage of your food is obtained from hunting, fishing, and gathering? What percentage is store-bought?

3. Discuss the benefits and costs of obtaining food locally. What processes are eliminated when you gather food locally? (Freight, packaging, advertising, etc.) What do you gain when you gather food locally? (self-sufficiency) What expenses do you incur? (equipment, expense/repair, guns, shells/bullets, etc.)

 

Mentasta student, Dawn Marie Rice.
Mentasta student, Dawn Marie Rice.
Courtesy of Megan Holloway

 

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
Contact
ANKN
Last modified August 17, 2006