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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

A Student-led Health Fair

Lorna David at the Mentasta Health Fair.
Courtesy of Maggie Gourd-Barrett
Lorna David at the Mentasta Health Fair.

 

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. interact with Elders and knowledgeable community members to gain pertinent information.
  2. develop language skills.
  3. develop group skills and learn how to teach others.
  4. create interactive, culturally relevant learning centers that address important local health concerns and knowledge.
  5. perform research to develop their ideas.
  6. organize an event that will help them raise awareness in their community about local health issues.
  7. learn how to coordinate with local and statewide agencies to provide additional health information and resources.
  8. use the information, experiences and projects that the students have compiled from the other chapters to create a health fair.

STATE STANDARDS 

English/Language Arts

A. A student should be able to speak and write well for a variety of purposes and audiences.

C. A student should be able to identify and select from multiple strategies in order to complete projects independently and cooperatively.

Government and Citizenship

E. A student should have the knowledge and skills necessary to participate effectively as an informed and responsible citizen.

Skills For A Healthy Lifestyle

D. A student should be able to contribute to the well-being of families and communities.

Art

B. A student should be able to create and perform in the arts.

Technology

A. A student should be able to operate technology-based tools.

B. A student should be able to use technology to locate, select, and manage information.

D. A student should be able to use technology to express ideas and exchange information.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

C. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to actively participate in various cultural environments.

D. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to engage effectively in learning activities that are based on traditional ways of knowing and learning.

Food iconTeacher Note: 

In the past, the Learn and Serve program provided the opportunity for health fairs to take place in Mentasta and Chistochina.

Depending on the scope of your project and the support and sponsorship available in the community, the health fair can include local, regional and statewide efforts. Students and teachers should approach the Village Council, other local Tribal agencies and the school board for support.

Also, Alaska Health Fair is a statewide organization that offers immense educational and structural support for health fairs and general health education. Their contact information is:

Alaska Health Fair, Inc.
907-278-1848
ahfair@ak.net
PO Box 202587
Anchorage, Alaska 99520

The following curriculum is designed for schools with K-8 and K-12 structures. Examples of "learning centers" created by the Mentasta and Chistochina students can be found throughout the chapter. They can also be found in the previous two chapters.

Karl Martin III and Brik Eskilida.
Karl Martin III and Brik Eskilida.

 

Lesson 

GRADES K -4

Activities:

1. PLANNING A HEALTH FAIR

A. As a class, decide what the health fair project focus should be. Consider the community needs, student knowledge from previous lessons, previous health fairs and local resources. What have they learned during the school year? What health information would they like to share with their community?

What are the different parts of the focus? Depending on class size, choose one topic to create one learning center or choose several topics to create a few learning centers.

B. * Write a letter (or have the students do so) inviting the parents to participate in the health fair preparations.

* Write invitations and do a community-wide mailing or community "walk-around" to deliver invitations.

* Design a poster to be posted about the event.

* Plan a student and community work party to decorate the gym or location where the fair will take place.

* Have students host the fair by bringing Elders to different learning centers, "teaching" their subject and serving refreshments. The health fair is an opportunity for kids to share what they know, where they received their information and what they would like to learn more about.

2. CREATING THE LEARNING CENTERS

Turn the student knowledge into posters, computer projects, games or whatever the student imaginations create. For example:

* Have students write stories about the subject. They may want to also include drawings or local photographs.

* Guide the students to create partnerships with the older students to work on their learning center.

* Use Hyperstudio or Kid Pics to create a student movie or slideshow of computer health education.

* Invite an Elder to teach the students some Traditional language words to include in the projects.

Make games focused on health-related concerns. Some ideas include bingo, guessing games, and a relay race.

Also, refer to the website below for creating a subsistence game for your area. ankn.uaf.edu/ Alaska Native Knowledge Network (Subsistence board game and curriculum)

The learning centers should be hands-on, interactive, include props, and be accessible to all ages and reading levels.

GRADES 5 -12

Activities:

1. PLANNING A HEALTH FAIR

A. * Have some of the students attend a Tribal Council meeting or go to a Tribal Council representative to tell them about the celebration and ask for their support. The students should also talk to the Tribal Council about good dates for the health fair. (For example, in Mentasta, the fair was held on a Monday. In Chistochina, it was held on a Saturday, according to community needs and school structure.)

* Have students speak to the health aides, caregivers and Tribal Council members about important health concerns in the community. They may want to ask, "What is health?" or "How can our community stay healthy?"

B. * In small groups and as a class, discuss the focus for the health fair. Consider the community needs, student knowledge from previous lessons and health fairs and local resources. What have they learned during the school year? The theme should provide focus for the following activities. What health information would they like to share with their community?

* What are the different parts of the focus? Have the students break into groups according to these parts of the focus. These groups will work together to create the interactive "learning center".

* Have some of the students talk to the K-4 students about the upcoming celebration. Encourage the students to create a partnership with the younger students to work on their learning centers.

C. * Ask students to attend a school board meeting to invite the school board's support and participation.

* Write a letter (or have the students do do) inviting the parents to participate in the health fair preparations.

* Form a list of people in the community who the students would like to have included as a health fair presenter. (A massage therapist, EMT, nurse, dentist, nutritionist, health aide, etc.)

* Write invitations and do a community-wide mailing or community "walk-around" to deliver invitations.

* Design a poster to be posted in the community about the event.

* Plan a student and community work party to decorate the gym or place where the fair will take place.

* Invite local health education and community groups to present learning centers, do blood screenings, perform audiology tests or do a dance performance.

* Create a radio clip to be broadcast on the local radio station(s).

* Have students host the fair by bringing Elders to different learning centers, "teaching" their subject and serving refreshments. The health fair is an opportunity for kids to share what they know, where they received their information and what they would like to learn more about.

Health Fair

 

Health Fair

Misty John dissecting a sheep eyeball.
Misty John dissecting a sheep eyeball.

CREATING THE LEARNING CENTERS:

1. Group research and rough draft

* In groups, have the students work on various sections of the theme. Students should write down what they know about the subject, what they have already accomplished for the project and what they still want to know. Have them write down their remaining questions and prepare for asking an Elder, teacher or community member for the answers. What do they want to share with their community?

* Guide them in research of any further information they may not have and to develop a rough draft project to show their peers for a peer review.

2. Turn the research into posters, computer projects, games or whatever the student imaginations create.

* The learning centers should be hands-on, interactive, include props, and be accessible to all ages and reading levels.

* Use Hyperstudio or Kid Pics to create a student movie or slideshow sharing healthy choices.

* Invite an Elder to teach the students some traditional language words to include in the projects.

* Make games focused on health-related concerns. Some ideas include bingo, guessing games, and a relay race.

Also, refer to the website below for creating a subsistence game for your area.

Alaska Native Knowledge Network (Subsistence board game and curriculum) ankn.uaf.edu/

Discussion Ideas:

  1. What are some of the most important health concerns in our Village?
  2. Has our community ever had a health fair? If so, what was it like? How does the community and how do the students feel about health fairs?
  3. What makes a celebration? What components do students want at the fair?
  4. Are health fairs important? If so, why?
  5. What does it mean to share knowledge? Why is cooperation and teamwork important? Was sharing important when our Elders grew up? Why is it important now?
  6. What would Elders like to see and have included at the fair?
  7. What would the community like to have included at the fair?
  8. What are some creative and "healthy ways" to advertise for the health fair?
  9. How can we share with our parents what we have learned about making healthy choices?

Mentasta students Cynthia Eskilida, Brik Eskilida, Zack Martin and Leandra Martin
Mentasta students Cynthia Eskilida, Brik Eskilida, Zack Martin and Leandra Martin learning about their respiratory system at the 2001 Health Fair.

Chistochina student, Adam Nicolai, shows Elder Lena Charley a movie he made on the computer.
 Chistochina student, Adam Nicolai, shows Elder Lena Charley

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


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Last modified August 17, 2006