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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

STATE STANDARDS 

Science

B. The student should possess and understand the skills of scientific inquiry.

Geography

A. A student should be able to make and use maps, globes, and graphs to gather, analyze, and report spatial (geographic) information.

E. A student should understand and be able to evaluate how humans and physical environments interact.

F. A student should be able to use geography to understand the world by interpreting the past, knowing the present, and preparing for the future.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

E. Culturally-knowledgeable students demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the relationships and processes of interaction of all elements in the world around them.

Our Watershed

Adam Nicolai on the bank of Sinona Creek. Summer, 2001.
Courtesy of Joan Herrmann
Adam Nicolai on the bank of Sinona Creek. Summer, 2001.

 

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. work with the Tribal Council and Elders to understand the historical importance of the area's watershed.
  2. develop a model of the watershed.
  3. map the route of water flow from the watershed to the ocean.
  4. determine what other villages, towns, areas, etc. also share this watershed.
  5. work with the Elders, Tribal Council, and other agencies to determine traditional and current use/activities occurring in the watershed.
  6. work with Elders, Tribal Council, and other agencies to determine the fish species and populations in the watershed area and their habitat requirements.
  7. collect data from the watershed, interpret, share, and graph.

Lesson 

GRADES K-12 

Activities:

1. Students will work with the Tribal Council, Elders and other agencies to identify the watershed for their area. In doing this, they should become aware of , through discussions with the Elders, the historical importance of this watershed and the area encompassed by it.

2. Once the watershed has been identified, the students should mark the area on their maps. This can be done by drawing in, coloring, or by the use of an overlay.

3. The students will need to determine by visiting the watershed (small portions that are accessible) the direction of flow. Then using a map, determine the flow route of the water from the mountains to the ocean. They may wish to locate on their map any other Village, town, etc. that also occupies or shares in that watershed.

4. The Tribal Council and Elders can help the students tremendously in understanding the recent past, current, and historical uses of this watershed. Students should work with them and, if feasible, contact the University of Alaska archives for any information or photos that might be available showing the use of this watershed.

5. The students may want to contact the National Park Service to gather information about the current fish species, populations, and their habitats in the watershed. With this current information, they should compare it with the historical information and with Elder knowledge of the area.

6. The students should access those areas of the watershed that they are able to and gather information relating to:

* water quality ( pH, pollutants, contaminants, etc.)
* water temperature
* water turbidity
* water conductivity

They should collect data by observation, Elder knowledge, and by western science methods.

7. Students will build a model of the watershed. This can be done with arts and craft materials as a diorama, or as a mechanical working demonstration model.

Water iconTeacher Note: 

Originally water was more important than land to the Athabascan people. The GLOBE website as further information and the protocols currently used by GLOBE scientists to determine water quality. See the 'Resources' section for the website address.

Stacie Charley and Adam Nicolai at Batzulnetas, 1995.
Courtesy of Agnes Denny
Stacie Charley and Adam Nicolai at Batzulnetas, 1995.

 

 

Discussion Ideas:

1. Has the watershed changed over the years?

2. Why is the watershed important to all who live near or share it?

3. What are the historical and current uses of this watershed?

4. What cultural uses occur in this watershed?

5. What uses of the watershed do you or your family take part in?

6. How can we maintain the quality of our watershed for generations to come?

 

Jena-Rene' Sinyon looking at stream ecology of Sinona Creek. Summer, 2001.
Jena-Rene' Sinyon looking at stream ecology of Sinona Creek. Summer, 2001.
Courtesy of Joan Herrmann

 

 Copper River Watershed
Click on images for a closer view
Copper River Watershed

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
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ANKN
Last modified August 17, 2006