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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

STATE STANDARDS 

Science

B. A student should possess and understand the skills of scientific inquiry.

D. A student should be able to apply scientific knowledge and skills to make reasoned decisions about the use of science and scientific innovations.

Mathematics

A. A student should understand mathematical facts, concepts, principles, and theories.

B. A student should understand and be able to select and use a variety of problem-solving strategies.

E. A student should be able to apply mathematical concepts and processes to situations within and outside of school.

Geography

E. A student should understand and be able to evaluate how humans and physical environments interact.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

D. Culturally-knowledgeable students are able to engage effectively in learning activities that are based on traditional ways of knowing and learning.

E. Culturally-knowledgeable students demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the relationships and processes of interaction of all elements in the world around them.

Tuu Tuu 

Water, Water

Angie David and Mandi Reedy stand at the inlet of Fish Creek to Mentasta Lake.
Courtesy of Barb Dalke
Angie David and Mandi Reedy stand at the inlet of Fish Creek to Mentasta Lake.

OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  1. work with the Tribal Council and Elders to locate the water bodies (lakes, rivers, streams or creeks) that have been of traditional importance.
  2. use a USGS/Regional or other map; draw in, or in some way identify the traditional water areas of importance or use.
  3. work with an Elder to find out, historically, how the people knew that the water was "good" and not polluted or compromised in some way.
  4. work with the teacher, Elder, and Tribal Council and test the water quality in those areas.

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
Contact
ANKN
Last modified August 17, 2006