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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Athabascan RavenWHOUY SZE KUINALTH
"Teaching Our Many Grandchildren"

 

 

 

STATE STANDARDS

Science:

A. A student should understand scientific facts, concepts, principles, and theories.

B. A student should be able to apply scientific knowledge and skills to make reasoned decisions about the use of science and scientific innovations. 

Geography:

A. A student should be able to make and use maps, globes, and graphs to gather, analyze, and report spatial (geographic) information.

B. A student should be able to utilize, analyze, and explain information about the human and physical features of places and regions.

E. A student should understand and be able to evaluate how humans and physical environments interact.

Mathematics

A. A student should understand mathematical facts, concepts, principles, and theories.

B. A student should understand and be able to select and use a variety of problem-solving strategies.

F. A student should be able to apply mathematical concepts and processes to situations within and outside of school.

CULTURAL STANDARDS

A. Culturally knowledgeable students are well grounded in the cultural heritage and traditions of their community.

B. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to actively participate in various cultural environments.

C. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to engage effectively in learning activities that are based on traditional ways of knowing and learning.

D. Culturally knowledgeable students are able to willingly give volunteer service for the betterment of their Village/community.

 

Mapping the Village 

Environmental Wastes and Hazards

"Putting Up Salmon At Batzulnetas" a painting by Molly John Galbreath
"Putting Up Salmon At Batzulnetas" a painting by Molly John Galbreath

OBJECTIVES 

Students will:

  1. work with the Tribal Council to locate and investigate any environmental wastes or hazards located within the Village area.
  2. give oral descriptions of where these certain places are within their region.
  3. draw a precise map to scale using standard measurements of the hazard/waste areas.
  4. convert standard measurements to metric.
  5. distinguish the difference between human and animal waste.
  6. define waste (garbage) and become aware of what happens to it after disposal.

Lesson 

GRADES 5-12

 

Activities:

  1. Have students measure, weigh, and document the amount of trash and garbage generated by the school for one day. Ask them to do the same at their home - everyone documenting, weighing and measuring on the same night. Then, all this information can be put together so that students will be able to estimate the amount generated in one day, one week, one month and one year.
  2. Working with the Tribal Council and Elders, have students learn, locate, orally describe and recall from memory the area locations, and map out (to scale, in both metric and standard measurements) areas where there is garbage, other wastes, junk cars, scrap metal, or other hazards.
  3. Working with the information gathered, have students brainstorm solutions to the waste/hazard/garbage problem. Solutions, such as recycle program, junk car removal, trash pick-up, fun days, etc. can then be prioritized and presented to the Tribal Council with suggestions of how they, the students, could be of assistance to the Village and Elders in a clean-up.
  4. Organize school recycle program and trash pick-up fun days.
  5. Put all information and clean up efforts onto school web page.
  6. Concluding the activity, have the students record their thoughts and reflections about the lesson along with the information given to them by the Tribal Council and Elders in their journals.

Courtesy of Joan Herrmann
Courtesy of Joan Herrmann

GRADES K-4

Activities:

  1. Have the students measure, weigh, and document (make a table) the amount of trash and garbage generated by their class in one day, one week, and one month. Based on this information, the students can predict the amount of trash generated by their class in one school year.
  2. Students and teacher will walk around the Village and note where the areas are that need to be cleaned of trash and garbage. In the classroom, the teacher and students may wish to orally describe from memory the location of these areas, and to draw a map of the Village and note these areas on the map.
  3. Brainstorm solutions to the Village trash spots. Have the students prepare a presentation to the Tribal Council, listing their brainstormed ideas as to how to clean up the area or control the trash.
  4. Help with the school-wide recycle program.
  5. Have students take part in a Village-wide trash pick up.
  6. Have students record their thoughts and reflections about the activities and the information learned from the Tribal Council and Elders in a journal.

Discussion Ideas:

  1. Where does all this waste go?
  2. What problems does it create?
  3. Why were the traditional Villages in the past free of waste problems?
  4. What is the relationship between a 'standard of living' and the 'generation of solid waste'?

Mentasta students Cynthia Eskilida, Angel Joseph and William Chickelusion watch as cars are crushed for removal from their Village
Courtesy of Joan Herrmann
Mentasta students Cynthia Eskilida, Angel Joseph and William Chickelusion watch as cars are crushed for removal from their Village.

 

Dedication

MSTC Mission Statement

Introduction

Prelude

In A Sacred Manner, by Wilson Justin

Learn & Serve Focus Groups

People icon

ELDERS

DENAEY (PEOPLE)

Interview of Elders

Clans of Chistochina & Mentasta

Why Are We Here?

Who We Are

Land icon

NANINEH (LAND)

Our Way of Life

Mapping the Village

What A Waste

Raw Materials

Our Natural Resources

Weather/Climate

Water icon

TUU (WATER)

Water, Water

Our Watershed

Food icon

C'AAN (FOOD)

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Gathering, Traditions and Nutrition of our Food

Keeping Ourselves Healthy

A Student Led Health Fair

Assessment & Performance Evaluation

Rubrics

Learn & Serve Program

Sources, Resources

Thank You

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
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ANKN
Last modified August 17, 2006