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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Yup'ik RavenMarshall Cultural Atlas

This collection of student work is from Frank Keim's classes. He has wanted to share these works for others to use as an example of Culturally-based curriculum and documentation. These documents have been OCR-scanned. These are available for educational use only.

 

 

 

 

Whitefish

Whitefish are the most abandant group of fish north of the Alaska Range, inhabiting almost every type of river or freshwater habitat in this section of Alaska.

There are seven different types of white fish: Broad, Humpback, Pygmy, Round, Least Cisco, Bering Cisco, and Arctic Cisco.

The Broad and Humpback whitefish are referred to as true whitefish. In both species the mouth is underneath, an adaptation for bottom feeding. Their diet consists mainly of small clams, snails, aquatic insects larvae and freshwater shrimp. In both species the head is small and the body is large. The Broad whitefish can be distinguished from the Humpback by its large size.

In Alaska the Broad (Akakiik) whitefish is found in the Yukon and Kuskokwim River drainages and in the Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea and Arctic Ocean drainages. Spawning occurs in the fall with most fish spawning over a gravel bottom. The Humpback (Cingikeggliq) whitefish is distributed in all drainages north of the Alaska Range, as well as in those of the Copper and Susitna Rivers. At 4 - 5 years of age they start their first spawn. Spawning occurs in October usually over a gravel bottom. They get to about 22 inches and five pounds in eight years. Both the Broad and Humpback whitefish are important in the subsistence ecomony of Alaska Natives.

Round (Qaurtuq) and Pygmy whitefish both have rounded cigar-like bodies with tiny pointed snouts and single nasal flaps. In both species the upper jaw extends out over the lower jaw so the mouth is underneath. The young whitefish have parr marks that disappear in the second year of life. The Round whitefish grows up to 16 inches in length while Pygmy whitefish rarely reach eight inches.

The Least Cisco is a slender herring-like fish. Adults are brown to olive green and silvery below. They are found in lakes, streams and estuaries of the Bristol Bay drainage. At 4-6 years of age mature Least Cisco migrate upstream in the fall to spawn. They are very important in the food chain because other fish such as sheefish, pike and burbot eat them.

Arctic and Bering Ciscoes (Imarpinraq) are similar in appearance. They are easily distinguished from the Least Cisco by their smaller eyes and scales, more silvery color, white pectoral and pelvic fins and terminal mouths. Both these ciscoes feed on invertebrates and small fish. The Arctic Cisco is found in Arctic Alaska (from Barrow east), Canada and Siberia. Bering Cisco are found in the Bering Sea drainages of the Seward Peninsula, Norton Sound and in those of the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers.

Jackie Paul George

Whitefish

 

King Or Chinook salmon

- Lois Moore

Coho or Silver Salmon

- Jonathan Boots

The Chum Salmon

- Willie Paul Fitka

Pink or Humpback Salmon

- Tatiana Sergie

Sockeye or Red Salmon

- Jack George

Burbot

- Lois Moore

Northern Pike

- Mary June Tinker

The Sheefish in Alaska

- Tatiana Sergie

Whitefish

- Jackie Paul George

Pacific Herring

- Cheryl Hunter

The Arctic Grayling

- Rose Lynn Fitka

The Dungeness Crab

- Rose Lynn Fitka

Rainbow Trout

- Willie Paul Fitka

Dolly Varden

- Cheryl Hunter

The Arctic Char

- Charlotte Alstrom

Lake Trout

- Jonathan Boots

The King Crab

- Charlotte Alstrom

 

Fishy Research Student Whoppers Parent Whoppers Elder Whoppers
Staff Whoppers Adventures Under the Sea Global Warming The Crystal Ball--Imagining how it will be

 

Christmastime Tales
Stories real and imaginary about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1996
Christmastime Tales II
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1998
Christmastime Tales III
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 2000
Summer Time Tails 1992 Summertime Tails II 1993 Summertime Tails III
Summertime Tails IV Fall, 1995 Summertime Tails V Fall, 1996 Summertime Tails VI Fall, 1997
Summertime Tails VII Fall, 1999 Signs of the Times November 1996 Creative Stories From Creative Imaginations
Mustang Mind Manglers - Stories of the Far Out, the Frightening and the Fantastic 1993 Yupik Gourmet - A Book of Recipes  
M&M Monthly    
Happy Moose Hunting! September Edition 1997 Happy Easter! March/April 1998 Merry Christmas December Edition 1997
Happy Valentine’s Day! February Edition 1998 Happy Easter! March/April Edition 2000 Happy Thanksgiving Nov. Edition, 1997
Happy Halloween October 1997 Edition Edible and Useful Plants of Scammon Bay Edible Plants of Hooper Bay 1981
The Flowers of Scammon Bay Alaska Poems of Hooper Bay Scammon Bay (Upward Bound Students)
Family Trees and the Buzzy Lord It takes a Village - A guide for parents May 1997 People in Our Community
Buildings and Personalities of Marshall Marshall Village PROFILE Qigeckalleq Pellullermeng ‘A Glimpse of the Past’
Raven’s Stories Spring 1995 Bird Stories from Scammon Bay The Sea Around Us
Ellamyua - The Great Weather - Stories about the Weather Spring 1996 Moose Fire - Stories and Poems about Moose November, 1998 Bears Bees and Bald Eagles Winter 1992-1993
Fish Fire and Water - Stories about fish, global warming and the future November, 1997 Wolf Fire - Stories and Poems about Wolves Bear Fire - Stories and Poems about Bears Spring, 1992

 

 
 

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Last modified August 22, 2006