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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
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Southeast RavenLiving in a Fish Camp

ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM GUIDE
Grades K - 5

JUNEAU INDIAN STUDIES PROGRAM
City and Borough of Juneau School District

JUNEAU INDIAN STUDIES PROGRAM
10014 Crazy Horse Dr.
Juneau, Alaska 99801

Department of Education
Title IV-A Indian Education Act
Grant #N008500191

*NO portion to be reproduced without the written consent of the Juneau Indian Studies Program.

FIRST GRADE

In First Grade, units are designed to look more closely at the forest environment surrounding the fish camp. Students learn plant and animal resources that have been used traditionally for food, clothing and medicine by the Tlingit people. Knowledge of our local resources helps children recognize the natural wealth we share in southeast Alaska. It also helps children respect the wisdom native people have gathered through generations of living in this environment.

As students "live" at fish camp, family roles are explored. Students learn through role-play daily family life as salmon are caught in the river and prepared for winter food. Your students will learn the interrelationship of respect for natural resources in daily living and ceremony as people celebrate their respect for each other.

Social Studies Emphasis: Family, School, Community

TEACHER INFORMATION SUMMARY

Unit I: Our Southeast Environment
Purpose:
We extend our knowledge of southeast environment to include the forest. We identify the trees, plants and animals found in the forest landscape surrounding our fish camp.

We learn how these natural resources are used traditionally by the Tlingit people.

Day 1 Southeast Alaska Forest Plants: "Making a Forest Environment"

Values:
  • Harmony with nature

Knowledge:

  • Names and characteristics of Southeast Alaska plants
  • How we use these plants
  • Tlingit plant names

Skills:

  • Recognizing forest sounds
  • Cutting
  • Coloring

Day 2 Southeast Alaska Forest Animals: "Making Animals for Forest Environment"

Values:
  • Respect
  • We share our land with many creatures

Knowledge:

  • Names and characteristics of five southeast Alaska animals
  • Characteristics of animal fur
  • Tlingit animal names

Skills:

  • Matching fur samples with animal pictures
  • Drawing a southeast animal
  • Coloring
  • Cutting

Day 3 Salmon Cycle: "Making a Salmon Cycle Circle"

Knowledge:
  • Stages of the salmon cycle

Skills:

  • Sequencing
  • Cutting
  • Coloring 
TEACHER INFORMATION SUMMARY

Unit II: Living in a Fish Camp

Purpose:
Building on the fish camp experience from Kindergarten, students now explore traditional Tlingit ways of catching, caring for and cooking salmon.

Using shadow puppets, the beginning of the Raven Creation legends is told by a Tlingit elder.

Day 4 Setting Up a Fish Camp: ''Making a Fish Camp in the Classroom''

Knowledge:
  • Names and characteristics of five salmon species
  • Tlingit salmon names
  • Recognition of color changes in salmon
  • Basic human needs (shelter, food, love, health)

Skills:

  • Cutting
  • Watercolor painting
  • Prediction of people's basic needs
  • Role-play

Day 5 Weaving Cedar Bark Mats: "Making Cedar Bark Mats of Paper"

Knowledge:
  • The weaving process
  • How cedar bark is utilized

Skills:

  • Patterning of over and under in the weaving process
  • Opposite patterning of under and over in the weaving process 

Day 6 Dry Fish and Other Tlingit Foods: "Sampling Tlingit Foods"

Values:
  • Respect for salmon
  • Spirituality

Knowledge:

  • How a salmon is caught with a traditional tool
  • Tlingit people gather food to supplement salmon from the river
  • Tlingit foods taste good
  • Salmon are dried for winter food supply

Skills:

  • Acceptance of new food tastes
  • Using a traditional Tlingit fishing tool to catch a salmon

Day 7 Making Hudson's Bay Tea: "Sampling Hudson's Bay Tea"

Knowledge:
  • The "hot rock" method of cooking
  • Native plants make medicine
  • Hudson's Bay Tea is medicine for cold symptoms

Skills:

  • Acceptance of new food tastes

Day 8 Making Tlingit Clothing for a Paper Doll

Knowledge:
  • How animal hides are used for clothing

Skills:

  • Cutting
  • Making a "leather" color 

Day 9 Making a Button Blanket for a Paper Doll

Knowledge:
  • How new materials for clothing become available when trading takes place

Skills:

  • Cutting
  • Recognition of colors of traditional clothing
  • Role-play

Day 10 Hearing a Tlingit Legend: "How Raven Created the World"

Knowledge:
  • Raven's creation of sun, moon, stars and daylight
  • Raven as a creator

Skills:

  • Listening to a legend
  • Retelling a legend
  • Sequencing of story segments
IN A SUMMER-FALL FISH CAMP

By Patricia Partnow
Anchorage School District

Background Information

Southeastern Alaska is rich in all sorts of marine life, and many sea mammals and types of fish were caught and used by Tlingits. The staple food, however, was the salmon, and a look at the Tlingit seasonal cycle might well begin at the start of the Tlingit year, in mid-summer when salmon fishing began in earnest.

All five species of salmon (King, Sockeye, Dog, Humpback and Coho) were fished by the Tlingits. Often different streams were the spawning grounds for different species, so the people moved from stream to stream as the summer progressed and the different varieties begin their upstream journeys.

Each salmon stream was owned by a particular local clan or lineage, that is, by a group of related men and their families (as were many other resource areas such as berry patches). Anyone not of the owner clan would have to ask permission of the lineage head before fishing there, even if no members of the owner clan were presently using the stream. Trespassing on clan property could result in partial or full payment of the catch to the owner lineage or, at worst, to feuds. If you live in Southeastern Alaska, there is a good chance that your favorite fishing spot was owned by a Tlingit lineage.

Families thus returned to the same fishing areas from year to year. The cycle was generally the same: by the middle of the summer, everyone had packed up skins, tools, cooking utensils, and other necessities, put them into the family's large dugout canoe, and paddled to summer fish camp. They set up camp alongside one of the salmon streams owned by the clan. Often whole households would move to a single spot, though sometimes the household would split into smaller family units, to hunt sea mammals, dig roots, or pick early berries.

Once salmon runs began in earnest in late summer, most of the time was spent fishing, cleaning and drying the salmon. Enough fish had to be collected by each man to last his family through the winter, and if his clan had planned a potlatch, he had to catch surplus for the feast. Thus, summer was generally a very busy time. Nonetheless, long days and mild weather made it a time to be looked forward to, and during the early part of the season, families sometimes held potlatches.

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Our Southeast Environment
Lesson: Day 1 Southeast Alaska Forest Plants

Materials:

  • Hemlock branch
  • Spruce branch
  • Forest environmental sounds tape and tape recorder*
  • Cloth skunk cabbage (or picture of skunk cabbage)*
  • Cloth devil's club (or picture of devil's club)*
  • Pretend fern plant (or picture of fern plant)*
  • Cloth blueberry bush (or picture of blueberry bush)*
  • Standup forest student handout
  • Classroom crayons and scissors

Preparation:

Gather a small hemlock and a small spruce branch

*Available from the Indian Studies Office

Objectives:

  • The student will be able to name five trees and plants native to southeast Alaska

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

In the upcoming days, we will explore the Tlingit Indians, their culture and their surroundings. Tell the students you will play a tape with familiar sounds. Invite the children to guess the sounds they are hearing.

Activity (Input)

Play the forest environment tape, stopping at each new sound for children to identify what they hear. Children will recognize the sounds of a person taking a walk in the forest.

Using a cloth vegetation (or pictures of forest vegetation) and the real hemlock and spruce branches, share information with the students about these plants. Include:

  • name of plant
  • where the plants grow in the forest
  • some distinguishing characteristics of this plant
  • how we use this plant/how forest animals use this plant

Activity (Guided Practice)

Ask the children to repeat the name of each plant in unison as you point to it on a standup forest student handout.

Activity (Closure)

Invite the students to color the forest vegetation. Show the students where to cut on the dotted lines and where to fold to make the forest standup. This handout should have the student's name on the back and be stored in a safe place until Day 2, when forest animals will be added to make a forest diorama.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Leave the cloth plants/pictures in the classroom for student exploration and discussion.

Standup forest student handout

Standup forest student handout
Click for bigger image

 

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Our Southeast Environment
Lesson: Day 2 Southeast Alaska Forest Animals

Materials:

  • Fur sample board*
  • Fur samples*
  • Forest animals handouts
  • Drawing paper
  • Tlingit animals labels
  • Classroom crayons and scissors
  • Standup Forest handout from Day 1
  • Plasticene clay for stands

Preparation:

Mount the fur sample board

Value:

  • Respect...
  • We share our land with many creatures

*Available from the Indian Studies Office

Objectives:

  • The student will be able to name five southeast Alaska forest animals
  • The student will be able to name five kinds of animal fur

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Challenge the students to look very carefully at the fur sample board. Remove the fur samples from their fasteners on the fur sample board. Ask the children if they can help you match the animals with their fur again.

Activity (Input)

As the children help match the fur and animals, give them more information about animal fur, such as:

  • Guard hair and soft fur (wolf, mountain goat)
  • Water repellant fur (seal, beaver)
  • Hollow hair (deer)
  • Animal fur that changes with the seasons (rabbit, fox, weasel)

Activity (Guided Practice)

Give each child a fur sample to match with the fur sample board for identification. Let them know they can take one fur to their work space to hold.

Activity (Closure)

Call the children's attention to the standup forest. "See how empty the forest appears?" Ask the students to recall some of the animals whose fur we just identified that make the forest their home.

Find pictures of these animals on the posters. Ask students to choose an animal they would like to make to put in our southeast Alaska standup forest. Have an animal handout sheet selected by a small group of students at a time. The top portion of the handout will serve as a reference for how the animals look and can be taken home to share the experience with their family.

Students can make a paper stand for their animals to place in front of the standup forest, adding a Tlingit name card for each animal.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Encourage the children to take their standup forest home to share with their family.

Teacher Note:

Refer to resource listing for "idea" books on Alaska animals.

 

raven and deer

squirrel and rabbit

brown bear and wolf

mountain goat and porcupine

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Our Southeast Environment
Lesson: Day 3 Salmon Cycle

Materials:

  • Salmon Catch to Can film from Alaska State Library
  • Salmon by Atsushi Sakurai*
  • Projector and screen
  • Handout of salmon spawning stages
  • Classroom crayons, scissors, and paste

Preparation:

Check out film from the Alaska State Library

*Available from the Indian Studies Office

Objectives:

  • The students will identify four stages of the salmon cycle
  • The students will put their cycle into a circle to share with their families

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Show some of the photographs from the book Salmon, by Atshushi Sakurai, that depict stages of the salmon cycle. Let the children know that the film they are going to see will show salmon:

  • coming up the river
  • making a nest
  • laying eggs
  • fertilizing eggs
  • parent salmon dying
  • eggs hatching
  • fingerlings in the river

Activity (Input)

Begin the film with the sound turned down, asking the children to let you know when they see salmon in the river. Let the students talk about what they are seeing and predict what may happen next. When the film is completed, recall the stages the children have seen.

Activity (Guided Practice)

Pass a salmon cycle handout to each child. Show the students the working parts. Ask a student to identify each part. Show how to paste each part in the proper section.

Demonstrate how to cut the sections apart and then fasten them together in a circle to make a salmon cycle. Classroom crayons can be used to color the salmon cycle.

Activity (Closure)

Check each child's work to be sure the understanding is accurate.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Encourage each student to "read" their salmon cycle to their family.

 salmon cycle
Click for larger image

 

ACTIVITY IDEAS FOR
(List activities of your own) 

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

ART

READING

LANGUAGE ARTS

OTHER

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 4 Setting up a Fish Camp

Materials:

  • Salmon insides study print*
  • Salmon species study print
  • Blue paper for river
  • Butcher paper salmon and salmon inside parts
  • Fish camp handout
  • Water paint sets and brushes
  • Water container
  • 2-Six foot 2x4's*
  • 2-White sheets sewn together end to end*
  • Optional velcro fasteners*
  • Rubber bands
  • Fish camp props (blueberries, clams, seaweed, dolls, animal skins)*

Preparation:

Have salmon and salmon guts drawn and stapled, ready for students to cut

* Contact Juneau Indian Studies for these materials

Objectives:

  • Students will make salmon and a river for our fish camp
  • Students will construct a fish camp tent and living area

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Recall with the children how they made a fish camp in Kindergarten. Let them recall as many parts of their experience possible.

Activity (Input)

Ask one student to describe how to make a salmon. Ask one student to describe how to make a fish camp tent. Tell the children we will make a fish camp again in our room. This time our salmon will have two sides so that we can put guts inside.

Activity (Closure)

Demonstrate how to make a butcher paper salmon

  • cut out salmon and paint
  • cut out guts and paint

Ask children to move to their working area and begin their project. Recognize Sockeye salmon, King salmon, Coho, Dog salmon and Humpies as children paint their salmon. Those children who finish their salmon early can help set up the fish camp tent. When children have completed their fish and cleaned up their working space, pass out a fish camp handout to each student.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Encourage students to take home the handout to share today's experience with their families.

 

Fish camp handout
Click for bigger image

Fish camp handout\
Click for bigger image
Fish camp handout
Fish camp handout
Fish camp handout

Dear Parents:

We have made a fish camp in our classroom to learn how people have lived near the river while salmon are spawning. Here are some of the learning experiences we are having:

  • catching salmon in the river
  • cooking salmon over a campfire
  • picking blueberries
  • digging clams on the beach
  • gathering red ribbon seaweed from the beach

This is my favorite part of fish camp:

 

Juneau Indian Studies Program

 

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 5 Weaving Cedar Bark Mats

Materials:

  • Photos of cedar bark mats and clothing
  • Read cedar bark(whole and shredded)
  • Cedar bark basket
  • A copy of page 115 from the book, Cedar, by Hilary Stewart
  • Brown construction paper mat backgrounds
  • Brown construction paper strips
  • Cedar bark student handout.

Preparation:

  • Cut 1" strips the long way from 12" x 18" brown construction paper.
  • Cut 1" slits in background mats from 12"x 18" brown construction paper, folded in half crosswise. Make the cuts to within 1" of the outer edge.

*Available from the Juneau Indian Studies Program

Objectives:

  • The students will weave paper strips over and under to show the weaving process
  • The students will weave paper strips to make a pretend cedar bark mat

Introduction (set/Purpose)

Show children the whole cedar bark. Ask for their ideas about what it can be.

Activity (input)

Describe how the bark is taken from the tree and prepared for weaving. Show the photos of cedar bark clothing and mats and talk about their use. Demonstrate how strips of cedar bark can be woven over and under, over and under. Then point out how the pattern changes to "Under, over, under, over" with the next strip.

Activity (Guided Practice and Closure)

Tell the children they will make a pretend cedar bark mat for tomorrow's Tlingit food. Pass out a mat background to each student with a bundle of strips in a central area by each group of desks. Monitor each child's understanding. Assist where needed.

Ask those students who finish quickly to help a friend. Remind the children to put their name on their mat.

Activity (Independent Practice)

This has happened above, but may also happen as children share the pictures of cedar bark weavings pictured in the student handout they will take home to share with their families.

Gathering Cedar Bark
Click for bigger image

Cedar Bark

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 6 Dry Fish and other Tlingit Foods

Materials:

  • A real dry fish (and access to the oven or microwave)*
  • Cloth salmon dry fish*
  • Paper dry fish and rack*
  • Small wooden spears (woosaani)*
  • Real frozen blueberries, canned baby clans and seaweed
  • Dry fish student handout
  • Paper salmon from the river

Preparation:

Arrange for use of an oven or microwave in school.

* Arrange with Indian Studies Office for a source of these foods

Objectives:

  • The student will catch a salmon with a woosaani in the river
  • The student will observe how salmon is cut for making dry fish
  • The student will taste real roasted dry fish
  • The student will taste blueberries, clams and seaweed

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Ask the students how we can catch some salmon for food from the river. If we can't buy a fishing pole from the store, what could we use?

Activity (Input)

Show the children the woosaani. Demonstrate how the point comes out of the shaft to allow for lots of fish movement without breaking the shaft. Using a salmon from the river, show the children how to catch a salmon.

  • Find a point behind the gill cover to make a hole to receive the woosaani point. Using scissors, cut a small hole.
  • Put the salmon back into its cardboard stand
  • Thrust the woosaani into the salmon, not letting the spear leave your hands
  • Make the salmon "jump for joy" as you catch it
  • Bring it carefully to the river bank and remove the spear point

Show the students how a salmon is cut for making dry fish by demonstrating with the fabric salmon. Then, unwrap a real dry fish from out of its wrapping and pop into an oven for quick roasting. (Bake at 450º for 10 minutes or microwave for about 5 minutes.)

Activity (Guided Practice)

When the dry salmon is roasted, serve little pieces to the students with blueberries, baby clams and seaweed for a Tlingit snack.

Activity (Closure)

Give each student a handout showing the steps in making a dry fish. Put the key words on the board for children to copy on their paper.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Invite the children to share this information with their families.

how to make dry fish
Click for bigger image

 

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 7 Making Hudson's Bay Tea

Materials:

  • Hudson's Bay Tea leaves*
  • Wooden bowl*
  • Metal pot with water
  • Eena (tongs)*
  • Ladle
  • Rocks*
  • Honey
  • Pretend fire materials*
  • Styrofoam cups
  • Student handout
  • Honey stirring sticks
  • Classroom crayons
  • Hot plate

Preparation:

  • Start the water heating in the metal pot early, if possible. Add the tea leaves.
  • The longer the leaves boil, the better the tea.

 *Arrange with Indian Studies Program for Hudson's Bay Tea and other supplies

Objectives:

  • The student will observe how cooking was done with hot rocks in a wooden container
  • The student will taste Hudson's Bay Tea

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Give each student a few Hudson's Bay Tea leaves to hold and smell. Ask if any one has a cold, sore throat, or runny nose. Ask about what our families do to help us feel better when we have a cold. Let the children know that before our families could buy medicine for us, people drank Hudson's Bay Tea to make a cold feel better. Tell the children we will make some Hudson's Bay Tea today.

Activity (Input)

Make a pretend fire with kindling and red paper. Hold the wooden container half filled with water over the fire. Ask the children how we can heat the water to make tea? What will happen if we put the wooden container on the fire? How else can we heat the water?

Show the students the eena (tongs). Pick up some rocks and put them in the pretend fire. When they seem "hot", wash them in a pretend bowl of water and place them in the water in the wooden container. Add more rocks, describing how the water is getting hotter and hotter.

Activity (Guided Practice and Closure)

Explain to the children how we can make Hudson's Bay Tea with a metal pot and a stove (or hot plate). We can sweeten our tea with a little bit of honey and it can help our sore throats, runny noses, and coughs. Ask for helpers to serve the tea in styrofoam cups to each child. Remind the children that the tea is hot, and how to cool it by blowing before drinking.

As we all are enjoying the tea, ask the students if they have ever seen this kind of a plant before.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Distribute the student handout. Ask the children to color the plant to share this knowledge with their family.

Hudson's Bay Tea
Hudson's Bay Tea

Hudson's Bay Tea can be gathered in the Juneau area at any time, including winter, as the leaves stay on the stems under the snow. It is a real pleasure to gather the tea. Your hands will smell fragrant for hours.

Hudson's Bay Tea is very high in ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), and among Alaskan plants is second only to rose hips.

Dear Parents,

Have you ever made Hudson's Bay Tea?

We have learned that this plant grows all around us in Juneau. We made some tea that will help our sniffly noses and sore throats. It tasted good, too. The Tlingit people knew about this tea long ago and still use it today. Your family may want to pick Hudson Bay Tea leaves. Here is a picture of the plant as it grows in the swampy meadows and here are directions for making delicious tea:

Hudson's Bay Tea

  • Pick several handfuls of Hudson's Bay Tea leaves
  • Dry them in the oven at a low temperature. Now you can keep the tea a long time.
  • Add one handful of leaves to two quarts of boiling water. Let simmer for 1/2 hour.
  • Sweeten with honey, if you like, and enjoy.
Juneau Indian Studies Program

 

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 8 Making Tlingit Clothing for a Paper Doll

Materials:

  • Laminated paper dolls with string ties for each student
  • Paper doll clothing
  • Paper punch
  • Marten, mink, rabbit, wolf, and beaver pelts*
  • Real deer-hide and moose-hide clothing*
  • Classroom crayons and scissors

Preparation:

If possible, have paper dolls laminated, punch holes for string

*Available from the Indian Studies Office

Objectives:

  • The student will explore animal hides and pelts
  • The student will hear how animal hides and pelts were used to make clothing
  • The student will make paper traditional skin clothing for a paper doll

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Ask children if anyone is wearing new clothing purchased from the store. Let the students know you have brought some materials that clothing was made from before there were stores in Juneau.

Activity (Input)

After identifying each hide and pelt, pass them to each group of students to explore. Show the difference between dried skins and tanned skins. Show pictures of people wearing leather clothing.

Introduce the little paper friend, identifying it as either a boy or a girl. Show the students the leather clothing. Talk about the colors of the pelts and skins we looked at. Encourage students to color and cut out carefully leather clothing for their friend. Demonstrate how the holes will be made in the clothing and how to fasten the clothing to the friend with a string.

Activity (Guided Practice and Closure)

Pass out a paper doll friend, a string, and paper clothing to each student. Be ready to help make punch holes in the clothing as it is cut out. Some students may want to make both boy's and girl's clothing for their friend.

Remind children to put their name on their friend and that we will make more clothing the next day.

paper doll

paper doll

paper doll

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 9 Making a Button Blanket for a Paper Doll 

Materials:

  • Paper doll and leather clothing from Day 8 activity
  • Classroom crayons and scissors
  • Paper clothing (button blanket, hat and boots)
  • Double stick tape for hat and boots (or 3M Spray Mount Glue)
  • Real button blanket, seal skin boots and cedar bark hat*
  • Real wool blankets (red and blue)*
  • Small container of buttons*
  • Deer hides and animal pelts from Lesson 8*

Preparation:

Mount the study print

*Available from the Indian Studies Office

Objectives:

  • The student will hear how blankets and buttons became available when trading ships arrived
  • The student will examine a real button blanket, seal skin boots and cedar bark hat
  • The student will make paper clothing (button blanket, hat and boots) for a paper doll

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Describe how trading was done with hides and pelts for blankets and buttons by using the real materials.

Activity (Input)

Encourage students to role-play a trading time by having canoe traders and ship traders exchange goods. Show the students a completed button blanket, pointing out the materials obtained from the trade.

Point out the family picture (clan design). Have a child tell about the owner of the blanket.

Activity (Guided Practice)

Remind students of the colors to be used for each item of clothing. The button blanket can be fastened over the leather clothing with the string tie. Hat and boots can be stuck on with double face tape.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Invite children to take their "friend" home with them to share their knowledge of Tlingit clothing with their family.

paper doll

First Grade Lesson Plans

Unit: Living in a Fish Camp
Lesson: Day 10 Hearing a Tlingit Legend

Materials:

  • Shadow puppets*
  • Extension cord
  • Recorded music and sound effects*
  • Elder to tell the beginning Raven Legend (The Creation Legend)
  • Student handout
  • Cloth raven's boxes and sequential pictures
  • Cloth raven*

Preparation:

  • Arrange for an elder to tell the story through the Indian Studies Program
  • Select two or three students to help operate the puppets
  • Set up the puppet stage 

*Available from the Indian Studies Program

Objectives:

  • The student will hear a traditionally told Tlingit legend
  • The student will observe shadow puppets acting out the story
  • The student will retell the legend with sequential pictures

Introduction (Set/Purpose)

Using the cloth raven or a picture of a raven, ask for children's knowledge of a raven--what he eats, sounds he makes, how he walks, etc. Let the students know that the Raven in the story they will hear is a different kind of raven than the ones we see around us. The Raven in the story is such a powerful Raven he can change the way he looks--sometimes appearing as a bird, sometimes as a man. He has a very strong spirit. Introduce the elder who will be the storyteller.

Dim the lights and begin the story...

Activity (Input)

As the elder tells the story, assist the students in operating the shadow puppets.

Activity (Guided Practice)

Give each student a handout. Ask the children to find the three ravens the story tells about. 

Activity (Closure)

Place the cloth raven's boxes in the classroom with sequential pictures at the story events for children to use in the fish camp area.

Activity (Independent Practice)

Invite the children to share their knowledge with their families.

Student handout
Click to see bigger image

Student handout
Student handout
Student handout
Student handout
Student handout
Student handout

ACTIVITY IDEAS FOR

 

MATHEMATICS

SCIENCE

ART

READING

LANGUAGE ARTS

OTHER

First Grade Resources

Available from the Indian Studies Library

Books For Children:

Blueberries For Sal, by Robert McClosky, Viking Press
A Salmon For Simon, by Betty Waterton, Douglas & McIntyre
Red Tag Comes Back, by Fred Phleger, Harper & Row
Salmon, by Atsushi Sakurai, Alfred A. Knopf
Small Wolf, by Nathaniel Benchly, Harper & Row
Lingit Aanee, by Patricia Partnow, Anchorage School District
The Tlingit Way: How To Treat Salmon, by Patricia Partnow,

Anchorage School District

Stories From Alaska, by Edward & Marguerite Dalch, Garrard Pub. Co.
Taku And The Fishing Canoe, by Neil & Ting Morris, Silver Burdett Co.

Books For The Teacher:

Tlingit Ways Of Long Ago, by Maude Simpson & Esther Billman, Sheldon Jackson Museum
Tlingit Thinking, by Katherine Mills, Southeast Alaska Regional Health Corporation
Gathering What the Great Nature Provided, by the people of Ksan, Douglas & McIntyre
Doug Lindstrand's Alaskan Sketchbook, Sourdough Studio
Coast of Many Faces, by Ulli Steltzer and Catherine Kerr, Douglas & McIntyre
Indian Fishing, by Hilary Stewart, Douglas & McIntyre
Alaska's Native People, by Lael Morgan, Alaska Geographic Society
Sharing Nature With Children, by Joseph Bharat Cornell, Anada Publications
English-Tlingit Dictionary: Nouns, Sheldon Jackson College
Beginning Tlingit, by Nora and Richard Dauenhauer, Tlingit Readers, Inc.
Effective Practices In Indian Education, Teacher's Monograph, by Floy C. Pepper, Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
Cedar, by Hilary Steward, Douglas & McIntyre
Indian Baskets of the Northwest Coast, by Allan Lobb, Graphic Arts Center Pub. Co., Portland, Oregon

Video Tapes:

Salmon, Catch To Can, Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game, (Alaska State Film Library)
The Choice Is Ours, U.S. Forest Service (Alaska State Film Library)

Cassette Tapes:

River & Seagull Sounds, Juneau Indian Studies Program
|Raven Creation Legend

Study Prints:

Salmon Anatomy Chart
Fish Camp photographs, Alaska Historical Library
Tlingit clothing posters
Living by the Seasons, Juneau Indian Studies Program
Southeast Alaska Animal Habitat Mural
Large paper female salmon
Women wearing cedar bark clothing photograph, Alaska Historical Library
Women weaving cedar bark photograph, Alaska Historical Library
Spruce Root Basket Collection photograph, Alaska Historical Library
Devil's Club, Skunk Cabbage and other Southeast Alaska vegetation photographs

Films:

Summer Of The Loucheux, Juneau Indian Studies Program

Other Resources Available From The Indian Studies Program: 

Fish Camp:
tent, poles, 2x4's
animal hides and furs
cabbage patch dolls and Tlingit clothing
baby swing
fabric blueberry bush
fabric animals and salmon
fabric clams, seaweed
button blanket, beads, buttons for trading
baskets and containers
deerhide tunic and sealskin boots
cedar bark hat
woosani for catching salmon
pretend fire|
Athabaskan dolls

Raven Creation Legend cloth boxes with star, moon, sun and daylight

Shadow Puppet Production Materials

Tlingit Foods:

whole dry salmon
red ribbon seaweed

Resource People:

Contact the Indian Studies Program for assistance in finding people with expertise as:
Historians
Singers and dancers
Grandparents with subsistence knowledge
storytellers
artisans
CONTENTS
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Kindergarten
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

Third Grade
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

First Grade
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

Fourth Grade
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

Second Grade
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

Fifth Grade
Teacher Overview
Teacher Summary
Lesson Plans/Handouts
Teacher Activity Worksheet
Resource Listing

 

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
Contact
ANKN
Last modified August 18, 2006