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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Yup'ik RavenMarshall Cultural Atlas

This collection of student work is from Frank Keim's classes. He has wanted to share these works for others to use as an example of Culturally-based curriculum and documentation. These documents have been OCR-scanned. These are available for educational use only.

 

 

 

 

Moose Fact SheetMoose Fact SheetMoose Fact Sheet

 

*The moose is the largest member of the deer family. Its scientific name is Alces alces.

*Moose are for the most part sort of a brownish color, though they can range from light beige to almost black.

*Moose are very large. It's best not to mess with them, especially during rutting season.

*Each year in Alaska, there are more moose-related deaths than bear-related deaths.

*Moose are herbivores, and it's a darn good thing they are. Otherwise there'd be even more moose-related deaths.

*The moose is the official State Animal of Maine.

*The moose is found all over the Northern Hemisphere, in Europe, Asia, and North America.

*Only the bull moose has antlers, and they fall off every winter. The cow has better things to do than grow silly appendages.

*The last words of Henry David Thoreau are reported to be, "Moose. Indian."

*The history of the name of the moose is confusing. Before the "discovery" of the New World, the Asian/European variety was called by names related to the English word elk. The North American elk, or wapiti, is an entirely different animal found only on this continent. So...ln Europe and Asia, an elk is a moose. In North America, an elk is a wapiti, and a moose is a moose.

*The word "moose" itself is derived from the Natik word moos, itself supposedly descended from the Proto-Algonquian mooswa, meaning "the animal that strips bark off of trees."

*Check out the following words for moose in different languages:

 

 Language

Moose

 

Hebrew

tzvi americani

Algonquin

moz

 

Hungarian

jávorszarvas

Athabaskan

dineega

 

Inupiaq

tuttuvak

Chinese

milu

 

Italian

alce

Cree

moosa

Norwegian

elg

Danish

elg

 

Pig Latin

oosemay

Dutch

eland

 

Polish

los

English

moose

 

Portugese

alce

Finnish

hirvi

 

Romanian

elan

Flemish

eland

 

Russian

los’

French

orignal

 

Spanish

alce

German

Elch

 

Swedish

älg

 

 

 

Yupik

tuntuvak

 

(Alces alces) The Moose

  

Moose Fact Sheet

 

Student Stories

 

Stories By Parents

 

Stories By Elders

 

Stories By Successful Hunters

 

Stories By School Staff

 

"If I were a Moose…"

 

 

 

Christmastime Tales
Stories real and imaginary about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1996
Christmastime Tales II
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 1998
Christmastime Tales III
Stories about Christmas, Slavik, and the New Year
Winter, 2000
Summer Time Tails 1992 Summertime Tails II 1993 Summertime Tails III
Summertime Tails IV Fall, 1995 Summertime Tails V Fall, 1996 Summertime Tails VI Fall, 1997
Summertime Tails VII Fall, 1999 Signs of the Times November 1996 Creative Stories From Creative Imaginations
Mustang Mind Manglers - Stories of the Far Out, the Frightening and the Fantastic 1993 Yupik Gourmet - A Book of Recipes  
M&M Monthly    
Happy Moose Hunting! September Edition 1997 Happy Easter! March/April 1998 Merry Christmas December Edition 1997
Happy Valentine’s Day! February Edition 1998 Happy Easter! March/April Edition 2000 Happy Thanksgiving Nov. Edition, 1997
Happy Halloween October 1997 Edition Edible and Useful Plants of Scammon Bay Edible Plants of Hooper Bay 1981
The Flowers of Scammon Bay Alaska Poems of Hooper Bay Scammon Bay (Upward Bound Students)
Family Trees and the Buzzy Lord It takes a Village - A guide for parents May 1997 People in Our Community
Buildings and Personalities of Marshall Marshall Village PROFILE Qigeckalleq Pellullermeng ‘A Glimpse of the Past’
Raven’s Stories Spring 1995 Bird Stories from Scammon Bay The Sea Around Us
Ellamyua - The Great Weather - Stories about the Weather Spring 1996 Moose Fire - Stories and Poems about Moose November, 1998 Bears Bees and Bald Eagles Winter 1992-1993
Fish Fire and Water - Stories about fish, global warming and the future November, 1997 Wolf Fire - Stories and Poems about Wolves Bear Fire - Stories and Poems about Bears Spring, 1992

 

 
 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
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Last modified August 23, 2006