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Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
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I˝upiaq RavenIñupiat Ioitqusiat

A Special Publication of Alaska Newspapers Inc.

"Those things that make us who we are"

Portrait of a People - By the People
Originally a supplement to The Arctic Sounder


Piqpaksrioiq Iyaallugruabnik
Love for Children

IMPORTANT: In order to view the pages correctly, you will need to download the Iñupiaq font (truetype) and install it on your computer. It's available as a free download from Alaskool.org.
Child with atigi


The Ring My Dad Made Me
Evelyn Karmun
Deering

My dad is Alfred Ballot Sr. He carves things out of ivory. He made me a ring with my name etched on it. He made it when I was about 10 years old. He told me to take care of it and don’t give it away.

He carved it in our house, but he goes outside to carve, too, so our house won’t stink. He also makes ulu earrings. He uses his dremel tools, sandpaper, files, and he polishes it after he is done.

Why did he do it? He wanted me to be happy. And he showed me how much he loves me. One of our Inupiat values is “Love for Children.” My ring shows dad’s love for me.

 

Child on lapLove for Children
Fourth grade
Kiana

The children will be wild if you don’t love them. They will be sad.

 

Love for Children
Eva Harvey
Noorvik 8th grade

I have learned that you never hit a child just because they did something bad.

I believe that if a person hits a child, the one who hits grew up with someone hitting them. In our Inupiaq tradition, the Elders never taught their children to fight. That’s the way it was.

They never taught them anything bad. Children need loving memories so they can pass them on when they are parents.

Love your children all you can and they will inherit your way and love their children.

The Inupiaq way teaches you to work hard so that we can teach children to be clean, have a nice home and a generous mind.

Love for Children can be exciting and rewarding. Love for Children makes me feel happy. To see parents loving their children is to see our culture being passed on.

It is still loving when parents scold their children. They do that because they love them. Loving a child means caring enough to say no. Love for children helps people to become better. Watching parents loving their children is heart-filling.

Being a parent takes patience and hard work. Children need proper clothing, food, help with school work, and guidance to learn right from wrong. Children need to explore places and go on vacations. It would be wonderful to take them to places and not drink in front of them.End Article

Love for Children

Photos courtesy of Hannah Loon/NANA

“ Love for Children can be exciting and rewarding.”
Eva Harvey

 

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Alaska Native Knowledge Network
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Last modified October 19, 2006