This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner Home Page About ANKN Publications Academic Programs Curriculum Resources Calendar of Events Announcements Site Index This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

"Ugiuvaŋmiuraaqtuaksrat"
Future King Island Speakers

A
PROJECT
Presented to the Faculty
Of the University of Alaska Fairbanks
In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements
For the Degree of
MASTER OF EDUCATION
BY
Bernadette Yaayuk Alvanna-Stimpfle
University of Alaska, Fairbanks
April, 2007

ABSTRACT

Just the older population of the King Island people can speak Inupiaq language fluently. The young people and children do not. In between the generations there is a gradual movement from speaking fluently to not understanding the language. There is a need to strengthen King Island Inupiaq. With this in mind, the purpose of this work is studying how other indigenous people have successfully revitalized their heritage language. They have fostered intergenerational learning of the heritage language through various ways. Based on this information, this project is an adaptation of “Inupiaq Phrases and Conversations” by Lawrence Kaplan and Lorena Williams in the Kotzebue dialect. I have adapted it to King Island Inupiaq as the two dialects have some differences though we can understand and converse with each other. The Inupiaq lessons are based on traditional cultural values and guiding principles.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

CHAPTER ONE

Introduction
Background-A Bit of King Island History
An Inupiaq Education

CHAPTER TWO: Literature Review

Who are the Inupiat?
Guiding Thoughts and Ideas for Native Language Survival
Successful Programs - Clemente Course
About Yaaveskarniyaraq
Successful Indigenous Immersion Programs
Te Kohanga Reo
Hawaiian Language Movement
An Inupiaq Immersion School
Disruptions and Interventions of Indigenous Languages
King Island Language Timeline
Fishman’s Graded Intergenerational Disruption Scale
What is Lost Without a Traditional Language?
Summary

CHAPTER THREE: Learning King Island Inupiaq

Cultural Values as Underlying Rules and Principals
Strengthening King Island Inupiaq Through Intergenerational Learning and Literacy
Learning Inupiaq Language – a framework

CHAPTER FOUR

Steve Krashen’s Theory of Second Language Acquisition
Methodology and Procedures for the Lessons

CHAPTER FIVE

“Ugiuvaŋmiuraaqtuaksrat” Lessons
Conclusion

REFERENCES

APPENDICES

Appendix A: Cultural Resources
Appendix B: Seasonal Subsistence Calendar

 

 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
Contact
ANKN
Last modified April 17, 2009