This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner Home Page About ANKN Publications Academic Programs Curriculum Resources Calendar of Events Announcements Site Index This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
This is part of the ANKN Logo This is part of the ANKN Banner This is part of the ANKN Banner
Native Pathways to Education
Alaska Native Cultural Resources
Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Indigenous Education Worldwide
 

Cross-Cultural Issues in

Alaskan Education Vol. I

PART III

COMMUNITY/SCHOOL ISSUES

When the schools came
village families were broken
like stones under a great hammer.

The age-old pull of the seasons of fish and game
still tugged at the chests of the men
with the insistence of embeded fishhooks;
and when the great caribou migration started,
or apochrophal schools of salmon
returned to Bristol Bay,
when jagged leads began to appear
like great seams in the Arctic ice pack,
or the first dirty trails of springtime
showed in the snow on the sides of mountains
pinpointing bear dens. . .
came the inevitable morning
to Native families throughout the northland
when there was something different in the houses:
men rose up earlier than usual,
and with great deliberateness
pulled on their travelling clothes,
drank coffee, talked very little,
and went out on the trail of their fathers.

Women stood in the doorways, saying nothing,
no longer able-as had always
been their custom-to go along behind.

Little children ran after
their daddies’ disappearing boat or sled-
helpless to prevent the leaving,
or the growing distance between them.

There were schools in the villages now,
and the White Man’s Law
said Native children had to learn.
Well, they w
ould.

-Bill Vaudrin

Toward a Synthesis of Cultural Transmission Processes-Jim Stricks
Education and the Subsistence Way of Life-Yupiktak Bista
The School Cultural Heritage Program: Some Questions-Jan Gibson
Field-Based Education for Alaskan Native Teachers-Ray Barnhardt

 

 

 

 

Go to University of AlaskaThe University of Alaska Fairbanks is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution and is a part of the University of Alaska system.

 


Alaska Native Knowledge Network
University of Alaska Fairbanks
PO Box 756730
Fairbanks  AK 99775-6730
Phone (907) 474.1902
Fax (907) 474.1957
Questions or comments?
Contact
ANKN
Last modified October 7, 2008